Author Archives: Karl Kandt

About Karl Kandt

A current Career Counselor, and former U.S. Army Reserve Officer, Karl Eric Kandt has also worked for Kansas State University as Assistant Director of Career and Employment Services, Wichita State University as Academic Coordinator for Athletic Student Services Department, his alma mater Emporia State University as Admissions Counselor, Assistant to the Director of the Office of Student Financial Aid, Coordinator of Student Recruitment, and Associate Director of the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, and his family’s ranch and farm. He has worked with students and alumni in defining career options, facilitating workshops in skill development, coordinating and assisting with career and internship fairs, and aiding follow-up efforts with recent graduates. Additionally, Karl has had the opportunity to attend and present at a variety of professional development conferences. In the early years of his career, he presented at a state-wide workshop for high school and college counselors, developed a workshop for new admissions counselors, and was elected Co-Coordinator of the Kansas Delegation to the Great Plains Association of College Admissions Counselors. Later in his career, he attended the National Association of Colleges and Employers Conference, served as Chair of the Special Projects Committee of the Kansas Association of Colleges and Employers for seven years, and attended annual conferences throughout the Midwest. Karl Eric Kandt has a combined 20 years of experience as a career counselor and a radio analyst and public address announcer in athletics at the collegiate and high school levels.

Career Tip: Track Your Project Participation

Project Management seems to abound in just about all job types now and your work in those projects can have a significant impact on your career, and in a job search.  Although the phrase Project Management used to mean a technical or construction project, it now encompasses any large project that an organization undertakes, regardless of nature.

To maximize your project involvement, keep notes on important projects you have participated in at work, including your specific role.  Track successes in the initial development of the project concept, gathering any requirements, meeting timelines and budget targets, implementation, any training you might have performed, documentation developed, project methodologies employed, and any software used.

From performance reviews and promotion possibilities, to raise requests and job searches, documenting your role in a project and the various achievements throughout its lifecycle can reap huge dividends in your career.  To your career success!

Career Management Quotes of the Week!

“The past is not your potential. In any hour you can choose to liberate the future.” ~ Marilyn Ferguson

Learning is easy. Application is hard. Most of the time we know what to do, but never do it. Doing it is the difference. ~ Unknown

New Year, New Job

t’s a common practice – a new year brings the desire to change jobs.  If you have decided to hunt for a new job in 2017, let’s get our job search house in order:

1)  Update your resume and make sure there is appropriate detail.  A resume is not a duties and responsibilities document – but a marketing document.  Tell the potential employer the successes you have had in your current and past jobs, and be sure to include appropriate key words and key phrases to your career target.  Also, don’t fall for the one-page myth.  A two or three-page resume is fine, and is what most jobseekers will have after they have been in the workforce for a few years.  Your experience, education, professional development, technical/computer profile, and professional and civic involvement warrants a depth of information.

2)  Consider more than one resume.  You are not a one-trick pony and most likely have two or three different career types your can pursue.  Don’t try to make one resume fit two or three career choices. Instead, tailor a resume and cover letter to each career type to ensure your career marketing documents work for you and not against you.

3)  Use job board aggregators, not single job boards.  Indeed.com and LinkUp.com are my two favorites.  Why search ten different job boards when you can search thousands at a time.  Sign up with just an email and a list of job titles (you may have two or three searches per site depending on your career choices) and let these sites do the search for you and send you a digest of new jobs that posted daily.  Then you can go direct to the company or recruiter site and apply for your job at the source.

4)  Set a specific amount of time for your job search and plan it into your schedule every week.  If you do not make time for your job search, and just work on it when you feel like it, you will have a long job search indeed and typically get very little done.

5)  Set up or update your LinkedIn profile, including a professional picture, and completed profile. You can make your updates private so they don’t show to your connections unless they go directly to your profile page (just go to the Privacy and Settings area).  Once your profile is up to date, target individuals from the organizations you have the most interest in and recruiters in your field(s) of expertise.

6)  Keep at it, a job search is not a short race, but a marathon.  That new job could be just around the corner, so don’t give up.

To your job search and career success!

Using Twitter as a Jobseeker or Employee

Social Networking

Social Networking

I’ll admit to being a bit of a Twitter newbie, as I don’t have tons of followers yet, but there are things I’ve learned using this tool I believe will help jobseekers and employees alike.

  • Get a real picture and write a real bio, even my slightly out of focus picture is far, far better than the twitter egg or some silly picture that makes no sense. While a little whimsy in your bio can be cute, don’t go too far – be professional, and think keywords.
  • Don’t judge a potential follower by their profession (within reason of course), but by their tweets and bio. Are they positive, in no way trying to take advantage of someone, avoiding constant cussing, racial slurs and bizarre remarks in their tweets, not overly political or religious, and can you speak their language at least enough to understand their tweets?  Likewise, just because someone follows you doesn’t mean you have to follow them back.
  • Please don’t spam people by trying to sell them something via Twitter, especially when you are not connected.
  • Don’t engage in arguments and any other negative conversations (on any social media), it just makes you look bad to your workplace or potential employers that might hire you.
  • Use Twitter to link with people you might not be able to contact easily via LinkedIn – if they follow you back, you can invite them to connect with you on LinkedIn as well.
  • Don’t run your Twitter feed on your phone, as just like your Facebook feed it will take up too much of your precious free time, instead visit Twitter directly a few times a week.
  • Do post information about your area of expertise, whether you create the content yourself or share it from another source (retweet). Think work expertise specifically, and try to post at least a couple of times a week so you look active.
  • Avoid over-sharing as no one needs to know where you are every moment of the day, or that you really like hot dogs with sauerkraut.
  • Use hashtags # to learn and connect with others. Hashtags are essentially a subject area, like #JobSearch, where you can learn lots of great tips for a job search.  You can also use hashtags in your own posts to help promote yourself to other followers.
  • Use Twitter to follow company’s you might want to target for employment, as most large and some medium-sized organizations have a career-related Twitter feed that posts jobs available regularly.

Be positive and professional in your posts and in those you follow and you will see your Twitter grow with quality connections and be seen as a knowledgeable and qualified in your field.

The Difference between Job Boards and Job Board Aggregators

Online Job SearchLike them or not, job boards are not going away, and continue to be a popular way for people to search for new positions being advertised.  They can come with a few issues such as reverse spamming (you join and put your resume on one site, and now it’s on 25 partner sites too), fake ads and job scams, and just like any other site, occasionally someone may hack them, but they do provide a good service.  The reason for this post is to learn a better way to use the job boards while protecting yourself from the above mentioned issues.

I am big promoter of Job Board Aggregators.  They still allow the jobseeker to use the job boards, but in a different way.  Instead of searching dozens of different job boards for potential positions, you can now use an aggregator to search hundreds, if not, thousands of job boards at a time.  Think of them like a database gathering the jobs posted on all the sites it searches and stores information from, and then allowing you to do ONE search.  Like in hospitality industry aggregator ads on TV, and I quote, “search one and done.”

So, here are a few recommendations:  http://www.Indeed.com, http://www.SimplyHired.com, and http://www.Linkup.com.  Indeed.com is the number one job board aggregator online, and acts as a job board too, as does SimplyHired.  My suggestion is you use them as aggregators only and then go direct to the company advertising and post your resume on their site.  To be more effective in your search use multiple job titles for the same job for which you are searching, such as:  Administrative Assistant, Administrative Coordinator, Secretary, Office Manager, Office Coordinator, Office Assistant, and Executive Assistant.  If you use only one title, you will limit your search significantly.  All of the above titles will fit in the search bar, and you can then sign up at the bottom of the first page with email only for daily updates of the new jobs posted.  The only different type of aggregator I listed is Linkup.com which actually aggregates company job boards.  If the company job board doesn’t require you to sign up before seeing the jobs they offer, then it will aggregate their content.  It works the same as a job board aggregator, you can sign up for the same type of daily digest email, but it is just for company-specific job boards like H&R Block, Sprint and Garmin.  I counsel jobseekers to use at least one job board aggregator and Linkup.com as there will be some different returns.

I hope this helps you refine both your job search, and saves a lot of time in your overall searching online.  Any time that is saved can be used to network, personalize your resume and cover letter for specific job applications, apply for jobs, and practice interviewing skills.

Bowl for Kids’ Sake Fundraiser

Karl Kandt currently serves part-time as manager of farming and ranch operations at K Ranch, LLC, in central Kansas. When Karl Eric Kandt is not overseeing activity on the ranch, he contributes time and money to a number of local charities, including the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Riley County (Kansas).

Led by executive director and north central regional director Jennifer Wilkins, the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Riley County has been serving local children for over a century. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Riley County presently assists about 2,600 pairs of mentors and mentees, yet there are still more than 50,000 local children in need who could benefit from a Big Brother Big Sister relationship.

One event the group regularly holds to raise awareness for its cause is the Bowl for Kids’ Sake fundraiser, which brings together public groups and local businesses for a friendly competition while serving as a call to action. Over the years, Bowl for Kids’ Sake has served as the organization’s largest gathering of potential mentors and volunteers, as well as an effective source of charitable donations that allows the organization to fund operations.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Riley County Programs

A philanthropist and community volunteer, Karl Eric Kandt supports a variety of community events and organizations. A regular donor to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Riley County, Karl Kandt.

Located in Manhattan, Kansas, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Riley County hosts social service programs to enrich the lives of children. Statistics show that a kid paired with a big brother or big sister volunteer, also referred to as a Big, is less likely to consume alcohol, use drugs, and skip school. Bigs have an option to volunteer in a community or school-based program.

Through its community-based program, children are matched with adults, couples, or families. The Big and child spend time together up to four times a month for approximately three hours a week. From visiting the park to enjoying a meal, the pair engages in various activities to develop a strong relationship bond. To volunteer in the community program, adults must be 18 years old and possess a valid driver’s license.

The school-based program takes place during the day and at the child’s school. Bigs commit up to a full hour each week to building camaraderie with their child by participating in a range of activities, including helping with homework assignments and playing basketball. The school program allows individuals who are a minimum of 15 years of age and a high school sophomore to participate.